Autor Thema: Fallout: New Vegas - Dead Money Design Breakdowns  (Gelesen 3192 mal)

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Offline Lexx

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Fallout: New Vegas - Dead Money Design Breakdowns
« am: 23. Februar 2011, 09:32:21 Uhr »
Mit dem Release von Dead Money am gestrigen Tage, kam auch ein neuer Blogpost von Chris Avellone im Obsidian Forum. In "Dead Money, Design Breakdowns" schreibt Avellone über einige der Entscheidungen, die für Dead Money getroffen wurden und die dafür gesorgt haben, dass Dead Money so aussieht, wie es eben aussieht.

Zitat
First off, Dead Money is a short story in the Fallout universe, pulp fiction style: it's a dime-store comic book (issue one in a limited series), an adventure story, a casino heist with a post-holocaust spin. It's never intended to have the length of a regular product, and being able to do a "game short story" is something that was fun to work on... usually we work on multi-year products, so doing a one with limited scope in a short time frame was gratifying in many respects. How do you create a game-equivalent ($10 vs dime store) paperback adventure? How long should it be, how should you present it?

As it says at the outset, Dead Money's a brutal, vicious adventure that puts the player in a bad situation, and it was designed to scare the hell out of Fallout players - although it didn't, in my opinion. The Survival and tension aspects ended up trumping that, which is fine, since survival's a subset of fear in my book.

We didn't set out to make Dead Money a Survival experience - we set out to make a Horror game that put Survival second. In terms of horror, I don't feel we succeeded, although it was a conscious effort to try and shake things up a bit with the enemies you faced to scare the player, definitely. The enemies are not only tough (which is easy to do with numbers, so I don't feel that's a real challenge), but also intended to be unpredictable when they fall, so you couldn't always count on shooting an enemy until they fall as being a guarantee that you're safe. The original hope was that the enemies couldn't simply be headshotted continuously - this is a selfish reason, as I get tired of watching people play like that non-stop (it doesn't feel like they're experimenting with limb-targeting tactics, despite the array of weapons), although the non-headshotting tactical diversion didn't turn out that way (it's just as easy to decapitate a head as a limb with the right blasts).
[...]

So the Sierra Madre and its surrounding Villa were designed as a reminder that some sections of the wastes are still scary, hazardous places where few can tread and survive, and while NCR may tame parts of the Mojave, there are other parts they can never hope to settle and claim as their own, and that's just the way I want it.
[...]

There's a few other things I'm happy with and always wanted to do, and I'm glad DLC allows for experimentation with this. Having an opening narration movie per location is something I've wanted ever since running Van Buren pen and paper games at Black Isle (and thanks to Bethesda for being on board with that), reactive end slides per DLC, having a "join the bad guy Fallout 1 style end movie" (which I missed ever since joining the Master's Army in Fallout 1, so we put it in DLC1 to allow the player to join Elijah), and being able to hook into some of the backstories in previous Fallouts as well as Mojave hooks (Veronica's relationship with her mentor, who Dean Domino really was, and Dog/God's ties back to the origins of the Nightkin and how some folks have exploited that in the present).

A few last minor things that make me happy that doing a DLC gave a chance to experiment with - I got to finally try to write a Torment "they communicate everything via text" character for a modern-day role-playing game with Christine to see how that would be received (mixed reaction, some people thought we were lazy or cheap, and they're partly right, even if that wasn't the intention - voice acting is expensive, and if we can get more story with less voiced words, I'm fine with that). Wouldn't have gone over so well in a larger game, I suspect, so glad the DLC allowed for it.

Den kompletten Text könnt ihr im Blog finden.

Link:
Dead Money, Design Breakdowns
only when you no-life you can exist forever, because what does not live cannot die

Offline 2tuollaf

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Re: Fallout: New Vegas - Dead Money Design Breakdowns
« Antwort #1 am: 24. Februar 2011, 10:44:32 Uhr »
 ...Chris sagt in dem Interview dass es im Spaß gemacht wieder ein Ende zu erstellen, in dem man sich auf die Seite des Bösen stellen kann.
Aber soweit ich weiß ist dass gar nicht in Dead Money enthalten dass man sich am Ende mit Elijah zusammen tun kann.
Hab sowas ähnliches nur im CUT-CONTENT von Vault über DeadMoney gelesen ???
 :'(Schade eigentlich ... bin zwar mit Dead Money noch nicht durch aber kann es sein dass man das vielleicht in der PC-Version von dem DLC machen kann.
mfg ;)

Offline Lexx

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Re: Fallout: New Vegas - Dead Money Design Breakdowns
« Antwort #2 am: 24. Februar 2011, 11:09:01 Uhr »
Ich habe es nicht ausprobiert, denke aber mich daran erinnern zu können, dass es Dialogoptionen gab, die in diese Richtung gezeigt haben.
only when you no-life you can exist forever, because what does not live cannot die

Offline Surf Solar

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Re: Fallout: New Vegas - Dead Money Design Breakdowns
« Antwort #3 am: 24. Februar 2011, 12:17:30 Uhr »
Man konnte definitv auch die "boese" Seite ausspielen. Also nix mit Cut content...

Offline 2tuollaf

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Re: Fallout: New Vegas - Dead Money Design Breakdowns
« Antwort #4 am: 24. Februar 2011, 12:38:03 Uhr »
Na dann ist ja gut  ;D wenn dieses Ende hier möglich ist :

Spoiler for Hiden:
n the years that followed, the legend of the Sierra Madre faded, and there were no... new visitors to the city. Years later, when a mysterious blood red cloud began to roll across the Mojave, then West toward the Republic, no one knew where it had come from. Only that it brought death in its wake. Attempts to find the source of the toxic cloud failed. The Mojave was cut off. Through the Cloud, lights were seen from HELIOS One. There were stories of ghosts immune to gunfire, who struck down anyone they saw with rays of light. The last chapter of the Mojave came when a modified REPCONN rocket struck Hoover Dam, releasing a blood-red cloud, killing all stationed there. All attempts to penetrate the Cloud and re-take the Dam failed, and both the NCR and Legion finally turned away from it, citing the place as cursed. In the years that followed, communities across the West began to die as traces of the Cloud began to drift over lands held by the NCR. Only two remained alive in the depths of the Cloud, at the Sierra Madre, waiting for their new world to begin again.

Freu mich schon aufs Ende !  ^-^